New RFID chips in credit cards allow hackers to remotely steal your identity – find out how you can stop them before it’s too late!

Friday, December 18, 2015 by

RFID technology is becoming increasingly common, as computer chips are now routinely being placed inside passports, drivers’ licenses and credit cards. Some school districts even insert them into student IDs in order to track their movements, disciplining them when they are caught missing class.

However, as is the case with most new technology, it is not secure.

The computer chips work by releasing an RFID signal that communicates digitally with nearby readers. The signal is broadcasted using electromagnetic frequencies that float through the air before connecting with the readers. Though the credit card technology – referred to as “EMV” which stands for Europay, MasterCard and Visa – has been used in Europe for decades, it is not foolproof.

Because RFID cards send signals that float through the air, digital readers aren’t the only devices capable of capturing your sensitive and very personal information – details that are of great interest to thieves.

In fact, identity thieves can steal the personal information on your passport or the financial details embedded in your EMV card from up to 10 feet away! A little scary, right?

“By simply walking near one of these RFID readers, your most private documents literally broadcast a signal using electromagnetic frequencies that can be digitally read by nearby readers. RFID circuits are now demanded to be included in enhanced drivers licenses by the Department of Homeland Security. They’re also found in your credit cards and passports,” wrote Natural News’ Mike Adams.

Even more concerning is the fact that cards embedded with RFID chips don’t have to be out in the open to have their information scooped up by thieves.

“RFID signals go right through your clothing, purse and luggage. This means details about your credit cards and identity can be stolen even if they seem securely stashed away in your pockets or purse!” adds Adams.

Luckily, there is hope.

There is actually a relatively easy and inexpensive way to protect your personal information from thieves in possession of RFID readers – RFID blocking sleeves – which essentially act as “bulletproof vests” for the electromagnetic signals emitted through the air from DLs, IDs, passports and other important documents.

There is more good news. They are extremely affordable. Part of Adams’ new Ranger Gear preparedness line includes a 10-pack of RFID blocking sleeves that easily slide onto your passport, credit card or DL. Right now, as a special introductory offer, you can get the 10-pack for only $12.95 – 50 percent off the regular price.

Click here to view the cards.

“These sleeves are like bulletproof vests for RFID signals. They block RFID readers from stealing your identity, and they can be used over and over again, an unlimited number of times,” explains Adams.

“These sleeves offer 100% blocking of RFID signals. Nothing gets through. RFID readers are rendered useless. This means that even government thugs and tyrants can’t track you with covert RFID scanning — a technology that can be used to track the movements of people through airports, bus stations, stadiums and other public venues.”

With the holiday season upon us, now is the time to pick some up – especially if you have some people on your list who are just plain difficult to buy for, because the RFID blocking sleeves really can be used by anyone.

Unfortunately, opting out of the computer chips now placed in cards isn’t an option. Banks will let you close your accounts before they will allow you to continue using your old card with the magnetic strip.

So, there is really only one option for protecting your data.

Another bonus is that the blocking sleeves are well-made and designed to be waterproof and tear-resistant, ensuring that they will last a long time. Click here to pick up a pack today. Be sure to act fast, before the sale ends too!

Sources:

NaturalNews.com

Store.NaturalNews.com

HeartlandPaymentSystems.com



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