Conservative German party brands EU a “failed project,” calls for its complete overhaul as a federation of autonomous nations
By Arsenio Toledo // Aug 10, 2023

Conservative German political party Alternative for Germany (AfD) has officially declared the European Union (EU) a "failed project."

This statement was published by the AfD in its current program, which was unveiled at the party's recent convention in Germany in preparation for the upcoming European Parliament election in June 2024.

According to AfD's program, the EU has "completely failed" to address many issues besetting the continent, including immigration and the green energy agenda. The party also made it clear that it does not support the adoption of the euro as a currency in Germany. (Related: Europe has spent hundreds of billions in energy subsidies to shield citizens from EU-caused energy crisis.)

AfD's program stopped short of demanding that Germany exit from the EU. Instead, the AfD is calling for the bloc to be overhauled and rebuilt as a "federation of European nations," whose main tasks would be the protection of the continent's external borders against mass migration, strategic autonomy in security policy and the preservation of the "different identities" that make up Europe.

"Based on these pillars, the member states can autonomously and flexibly conclude functional bilateral or multilateral agreements according to their needs. Our idea of Europe is clear: sovereign nation-states instead of an EU superstate and debt union, free citizens instead of protection and bureaucratic incarceration. And people living together in peace and respect on our continent," the party said.

AfD could take over Germany by 2025

The release of this program comes at a time when the AfD's popularity in Germany is steadily rising. Recent polls put support for the conservative party at between 18 percent to a record-high of 23 percent.

Germany is due to hold another federal election in 2025. If current electoral trends persist, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz's left-wing Social Democratic Party (SDP) will likely be dethroned as the biggest party, and his three-party coalition with the pro-business Free Democratic Party (FDP) and the environmentalist Greens might not have enough seats to form a majority in parliament.

Despite the clear threat posed by the AfD, Scholz and his party seem unfazed, with the chancellor stating back in June that he was "confident that the AfD won't do any better in the next general election than it did in the last one."

The AfD also has to go up against the "firewall" that Germany's five other main parties – the SDP, FDP, Greens, the Left Party and the conservative bloc of the Christian Democratic Union and the Christian Social Union (CDU/CSU) – set up. This firewall is essentially a vow not to work with the AfD in any form, whether at the federal, state or local level.

CDU Leader Friedrich Merz reiterated that this firewall will remain up as he insisted that there would never be any kind of cooperation between his party and the AfD, even at the local level.

Leading members of the AfD recently spoke out against cooperating with the CDU/CSU of former Chancellor Angela Merkel – a departure from previous statements made by AfD Co-Leader Tino Chrupalla who batted for the CDU to dismantle the firewall against the party.

AfD Deputy Chairman Stephan Brandner recently stated that he did "not see a reason to approach" the CDU, noting that the party had their chance to try to cooperate with the AfD for "much too long."

But before the 2025 federal election, AfD leaders are gearing up for the EU parliament election next year as well as several state-level elections, including two later this year. Chrupalla pointed out that current polling suggests that the party might end up becoming the biggest party in at least three state elections in eastern Germany.

"We could take on government responsibility," said Chrupalla.

The party's goal in the upcoming state elections is to gain enough support that it would be impossible for any of the other parties to form a majority without cooperating with the AfD. Should the "taboo" of cooperating with the AfD be broken at the state level, it could make future breaches of the so-called firewall less controversial.

Chrupalla even noted that the party would be in government in the near future "first in a state in the east, and then in the west, and then nationally."

"There are some politicians who want to build firewalls," Chrupalla added. "We East Germans have experience with walls, and the last wall that was built in Germany [the Berlin Wall] … we East Germans tore it down."

Learn more about the downturn in global governments at BigGovernment.news.

Watch this video discussing whether the AfD can successfully topple the globalist government in Germany.

This video is from the Brian Ruhe channel on Brighteon.com.

More related stories:

Leaked documents: Socialist Spain wants the EU to ban all end-to-end encryption.

Europeans don't realize "one day they will become a minority in their own countries," warns best-selling South African writer Ernst Roets in interview with Hungarian media.

STARVE FOR THE CLIMATE: European Union partners with Dutch government to shut down dairy, cattle, pig and poultry farms across the country.

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Sources include:

Breitbart.com

APNews.com

DW.com

ForeignPolicy.com

Brighteon.com



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