DARK SECRETS: Musk’s company Neuralink HIDES photos of DEAD animal subjects used to test brain implants
By Zoey Sky // Oct 11, 2023

Neuralink, Elon Musk's brain implant startup, has recently received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval to begin clinical trials for brain implants. However, according to a shocking Wired investigation, Neuralink and the University of California–Davis (UCD) worked together to hide the gruesome photos of dead animal subjects that were experimented on.

In one experiment, California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) staff observing a tan macaque via livestream recognized the signs of a "severe neurological defect." The monkey was seen sitting helpless as her brain began to swell.

She advised that the monkey must be put "to sleep," but the client, a Neuralink scientist whose experiment left the seven-year-old monkey's brain mutilated, told her to wait another day.

The attending staff observed as the suffering monkey seized and vomited. Eventually, the monkey's right leg went limp, and she was unable to support the weight of her 15-pound body without holding on to the bars of her cage.

An attendant placed a heat lamp beside the animal to keep her warm. Sometimes, she would wake and scratch at her throat, retching and struggling to breathe, before collapsing with exhaustion.

An autopsy later revealed that the mounting pressure inside the macaque's skull deformed and ruptured her brain. A toxic adhesive around the Neuralink implant bolted to the monkey's skull had leaked internally.

The inflammation then caused painful pressure on a part of the brain producing cerebrospinal fluid, the slick, translucent liquid in which the brain floats in. The hind quarter of her brain visibly poked out of the base of her skull. (Related: Brain CONTROL: Musk’s neurotechnology company Neuralink looking for brain implant trial volunteers.)

According to records obtained by Wired, the monkey was finally euthanized on September 13, 2018.

Regulators later acknowledged that the incident was a clear violation of the Animal Welfare Act, a federal law that is meant to set minimally acceptable standards for the handling, housing and feeding of research animals. But the shocking incident didn't have any consequences.

Between 2016 and 2021, the United States Department of Agriculture enforced the humane treatment of animals through "teachable moments."

The CNPRC, which is home to a colony of nearly 5,000 primates run by UCD, cannot be legally cited because it proactively reported the violation. The same goes for Neuralink.

A former Neuralink employee said that while "the implant itself did not cause death," the monkey was euthanized "to end her suffering." The employee signed a confidentiality agreement and requested not to be identified.

Animal photographs and videos missing

The veterinary records released by UCD are missing hundreds of photographs of Neuralink’s test subjects taken by the primate center's staff between 2018 and 2020.

While UCD is publicly funded and bound by California’s open records law, it has fought disclosure of the photographs for more than a year. UCD claims that releasing them "would not serve the public's interest."

At the same time, videos of the experiments have allegedly disappeared. Documents obtained by Wired revealed that the primate center’s staff wrote about reviewing a "tape" of the tan macaque hours before they stopped her heart.

Yet UCD has not acknowledged that such a tape exists, and Neuralink, whose partnership with the school ended back in 2020, was allowed to store its own footage and remove it from the property when it wanted to do so.

In a September 2021 email to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), UCD claimed that Neuralink "provided their own computing infrastructure, and they had their own network connection, and they have removed their computing infrastructure from the premises."

PCRM is suing UCD for the release of images and videos of Neuralink's experiments there.

Records also revealed that UCD instructed Neuralink to request permission before recording any of the animals, with the school reserving the right to view the footage.

Internal emails showed that Neuralink had tight control over what UCD was allowed to reveal about the experiments.

Macaques procured for Neuralink from the UCD colony were trained for several months or years before being operated on, revealed a former Neuralink employee. However, they had "abysmal" chances of survival, partly because of "poor planning and poor procedure."

Visit ElonMuskWatch.com for more news on Elon Musk and Neuralink.

Watch Elon Musk say that artificial intelligence could kill all humans.

This video is from the Red Voice Media channel on Brighteon.com.

More related stories:

UNESCO warns against BRAIN CHIPS being used as “personality-altering weapons.”

Elon Musk’s medical device company Neuralink facing federal investigation over animal testing.

Elon Musk’s Neuralink receives FDA approval to begin clinical trials for brain implants.

Sources include:

Wired.com

NAL.USDA.gov

InsideHigherEd.com

Brighteon.com



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