U.S. servicemen who refused COVID-19 vaccines sue federal government, demand billions of dollars for lost pay
By Belle Carter // Dec 01, 2023

More than 8,000 active-duty U.S. service members were discharged from the military for refusing to be administered the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine, which was made compulsory by President Joe Biden's government from August 2021 through January 2023. The mandate was revoked by law as the National Defense Authorization Act – making it the first time in U.S. military history that a vaccine requirement was reversed.

Now, some of these men are filing lawsuits against the federal government, demanding billions of dollars worth of lost pay and benefits when they were discharged from the service. Atty. Dale Saran, a retired Marine and one of the lawyers who reportedly brought down the anthrax vaccine with fellow attorneys Andy Meyer and Brandon Johnson, is representing the former troops in three separate lawsuits they plan to turn into a class action lawsuit, independent news site Breitbart reported.

"The amount of money is in the billions," Saran told the outlet. "That's just flat-out. That's what it is in backpay. It's billions of dollars."

According to the legal counsel that represents all service members who were either kicked out or illegally ordered to stop drilling, resulting in loss of pay or benefits, the lawsuits were filed in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which Saran said is a specialized court where illegal discharges are heard. "The Court of Claims has been around since the Reconstruction Era. It's a very old court and kind of a weird one. But in any event, you can go there if you've got a claim and say, 'Hey, I was illegally discharged, or the military did something to impede my pay,' or whatever. The Court of Claims is where you go," he explained.

As per his computation, around 80,000 to 100,000 active-duty and reservist service men were impacted by the mandate. Tens of thousands of reservists were told not to drill anymore or were moved to inactive status. "They were basically [without] the benefit of any due process. No boards were held. They didn't hold any administrative separation boards; they didn't hold any hearings. They didn't do any federal recognition boards; none of the administrative or judicial procedures were used. They just flat-out did it. And then…they got the Coast Guard to follow along, and they got a bunch of Coasties too," the lawyer noted.

One of the former Coasties suing for damages is Zach Loesch. Biden called him to personally thank him for saving lives during Hurricane Ian. At the time, Loesch was two weeks away from being kicked out of the Coast Guard for not taking the vaccine.

Army is desperate to win back unvaccinated, "involuntarily separated" troop members

News of the lawsuits followed reports of the U.S. Army informing troops "involuntarily separated" for not taking the coronavirus shot can have their military records corrected due to the reversal of the jab mandate.

The letter from U.S. Army Director of Military Personnel Management Hope Rampy trying to win back soldiers went viral on social media. "We write to notify you of new Army guidance regarding the correction of military records for former members of the Army following rescission of the COVID-19 vaccination requirement. As a result of the rescission of all current COVID-19 vaccination requirements, former soldiers who were involuntarily separated for refusal to receive the COVID-19 vaccination may request a correction of their military records from either or both the Army Discharge Review Board (ADRB) or the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (ABCMR)," he wrote in the correspondence.

One X user named Frank Grimes Jr. captioned his post with the attachment: "The U.S. Army sent a 'whoops-we-messed-up-we-need-you' letter to the service members wrongly fired for being unvaccinated They should not go back and see this as a blessing and not give their life for a corrupt government who does not care about them."

CNN reported that only 43 of more than 8,000 U.S. service members who were discharged from the military for dodging the jabs have sought to rejoin eight months after the vaccine mandate was officially repealed, according to data provided by the military branches. Nineteen soldiers have rejoined the Army, while 12 have returned to the Marines, according to service spokespeople. The numbers are even smaller for the Air Force and Navy, where only one and two have rejoined, respectively, the services said. (Related: Military servicemen call for an end to the Pentagon's vaccine mandate.)

Read more about governments' tyrannical measures during the pandemic on MedicalMartialLaw.com.

Sources for this article include:

100PercentFedUp.com

Breitbart.com

WLTReport.com

Edition.CNN.com



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