Russia has already begun destroying advanced US weapons systems sent to Ukraine
07/11/2022 / By JD Heyes / Comments
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Russia has already begun destroying advanced US weapons systems sent to Ukraine

The United States continues to drain its stockpile of weapons, many of them advanced long-range missile and artillery systems, by supplying them to Ukraine, but almost as fast as many of them arrive, they are being destroyed by Russian forces.

Last week Russia’s defense ministry claimed that its forces managed to locate and destroy two High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) that were only recently supplied to Ukraine, the loss of which cannot be sustained.

The systems are meant to greatly expand Ukraine’s long-range firing capabilities in order to match those of Russia. But in keeping with an earlier pledge, Moscow announced that its forces would target any weapons systems supplied by foreign nations and ultimately hold them “responsible.”

There was no independent confirmation that Russian troops took out the two systems, but to be honest, it’s not like the Ukrainians would confirm that the systems were destroyed even if true. That’s because Kyiv doesn’t want to lose its weapons gravy train being supplied primarily by U.S. taxpayers; admitting the HIMARS were taken out is a tacit admission that a) supplying such systems is pointless because b) the Ukrainians have no way to protect them.

However, “if accurate, it would be a devastating rollback of efforts to give Kiev longer range rockets, given at this point the Ukrainians likely only possess less than half a dozen HIMARS. It also takes time to train the Ukrainians on the complicated mobile systems being transferred,” Zero Hedge reports.

Brighteon.TV

“This could mean the destruction of half of the US-made HIMARS deployed by the Ukrainians. Reuters recounts, ‘Ukraine had received only four HIMARS systems as of early July, the European Council on Foreign Relations said in a report. The U.S. has pledged to deliver eight by mid-July,'” the site added.

Reuters noted further, citing Russian military sources:

It also said Russian forces destroyed two ammunition depots storing rockets for the HIMARS near the frontline in a village south of Kramatorsk in Ukraine’s Donetsk region – the main focus for Russian troops following the capture of Luhansk over the weekend.

The ministry released video footage which it said showed the strike. Reuters could not independently verify the strike.

One military analyst, Samuel Ramani, noted that the Kremlin’s claim “underscores Russia’s desire to specifically target HIMARS shipments from the U.S. to Ukraine” — likely because the Russian military is keenly aware that the systems are highly effective and the Ukrainians can’t protect them.

If true, what the destruction of the HIMARS also does is move the U.S. and Russia that much closer to a direct conflict since Russian troops appear to be specifically looking for any weapons that have been supplied by foreign (largely NATO) countries. That would especially include long-range rocket and artillery systems, for obvious reasons.

Late last month, the Ukrainian military said that it took out a Russian military base using a HIMARS.

What does US aid to Ukraine look like? It looks like a destroyed Russian base. The long-awaited M142 HIMARS made their first appearance this week, striking in Izyum, Ukraine. Info is still pending, but one thing is clear: Artillery is the King of Battle,” a Twitter user called CJ noted in a post that contained video footage of what appears to be destroyed Russian military vehicles and equipment.

The Biden regime seems to want war with Russia.

Sources include:

ZeroHedge.com

NationalSecurity.news

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